British Values

Being Part of Britain

As a school, we value and celebrate the diverse heritages of everybody at Manor Park. Alongside this, we value and celebrate being part of Britain. In general terms, this means that we celebrate traditions, such as customs in the course of the year, for example, Remembrance during the Autumn term, and annual visit from the Pantomime around Christmas. We also celebrate the Saints days; St. George for England, St. David for Wales and St. Andrew for Scotland.

Further, children learn about being part of Britain from different specific perspectives. Two specific examples of when we teach about being part of Britain are:

Geographically: Children learn about the world.

  • its capital cities and counties, its rivers and mountains
  • how 'Great Britain' differs from 'England' and 'the United Kingdom'
  • rest of Europe and other countries in the world

Historically: Children learn about the history of Britain. They discover different aspects of life and how this has developed and changed over time.

  • Year 2 investigate significant individuals through History in their topic, 'Towers, Tunnels and Turrets.'
  • Year 3's topic 'Tribal tales,' sees the children discovering the events during the Stone Age, Iron Age and Bronze age.
  • Year 4 learn about the Anglo Saxons and how they helped to shape the country we live in today.
  • Year 5 learn about Henry VIII and the impact of his choices.
  • Year 6 learn about how WW2 and how this affected children during this time.

The Rule of Law

The children are reminded often of the importance of rules and the need for them in society and in our school.

  • Children are very aware of the different golden rules and the consequences of these being broken.
  • Visits from the Police/Fire brigade
  • Children set their own law - class charter - for the classroom that they promise to follow.
  • Children have the chance to attend school council.
  • Sporting activities (e.g. sports leaders/netball matches with other schools) reinforce the need for rules.

Individual liberty

The children are encouraged to express their views and beliefs in a supportive and respectful environment. Through P4C and PSE, the children put forward their opinion and learn to be accepting of the difference between them. They are given the choice throughout school

  • Choices around the participation in extra-curricular activities
  • The children learn about significant individuals who have championed for liberty such as Martin Luther King and learn about those that have had individual liberty taken away such as those during the holocaust.
  • Diversity displays
  • Learning during engage week is child led
  • Children choose their activity from the curriculum choice grid- linked to their home learning.
  • The school has decided on values for victory: friendship, Excellence, Opportunity, Commitment, Creativity, Cooperation, Resilience, Reflection, Respect, Honesty, and Support. Each month the classes are given the opportunity to decide who they think deserves the award the most for that month.

Mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs

The children at Manor Park are taught from the very beginning of their education here how to treat others properly in spite of their differences, beliefs or backgrounds. The recent Ofsted report stated; "all staff and pupils say that their school operates as a harmonious community." Outside agencies and school trips often report how well behaved the students are.

  • By the time children reach year 6, they will have learnt about all the major religions and had the opportunity to visit all places of worship.
  • They children take part in many assemblies: RE, Adoption, Autism, Disability, Olympians, a range of charities
  • Multi-cultural day with all years cooking a different food from different countries
  • Children take part in Black history month
  • Adults provide positive role models for children
  • During sporting matches/events children are taught to be tolerant and play fairly with each other.
  • The Playground Pals scheme sees year 5 students encouraging children to respect each other and modelling behaviour.

Democracy

The children are encouraged to discuss their thoughts regularly and are taught different ways to listen sensibly to each other, acknowledging that everyone has different opinions, thorough P4C and PSE. This teaching is a great stepping stone for their lives outside of Manor Park. There are many opportunities for children and staff to have their say and get their voices heard:

  • School council. This changes every 2 weeks so that all pupils have a chance to have their own opinion put across. This is then fed back to the rest of their class during class council when they return.
  • The school has decided on values for victory: friendship, Excellence, Opportunity, Commitment, Creativity, Cooperation, Resilience, Reflection, Respect, Honesty, and Support. Each month the rest of the class are given the opportunity to decide who they think deserves the award the most for that month.
  • At the beginning of the year, children work as a class to devise their own charter which sets the rules they will follow for the rest of the year.
  • Children complete questionnaires to give their opinion on how the school and different subjects can be improved
  • Examples of the children's democratic voice:
    • Children chose the lower hall to be decorated as a French bistro
    • Children choose how to raise money and what to dress up for, for mufti days.
    • Children chose to put astro-turf on the field so it could be used all year.